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New York City Program

Karen Prentice-Duprey
(on behalf of the Program Administrator and Directors)
315-859-4634

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR:
Christophre Georges, Professor of Economics
(315) 859-4472

PROGRAM DIRECTORS:
Erol Balkan (Director, Fall '14)
Patricia O'Neill (Director, Spr '15)
Chris Georges (Director, Fall '15)
Daniel Chambliss (Director, Spr '16)

Programs

Fall 2008

Environmentalism in the Global City

Director: Katheryn Doran, Associate Professor of Philosophy (kdoran@hamilton.edu)

We will critically examine some of the global issues and challenges for environmentalism including famine, overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, and of course climate change.

 
College 398 Seminar in Global Processes: Environmental Ethics and the Global City

Critical examination of some of the global issues and challenges for environmentalism including famine, overpopulation, urbanization, pollution, and of course climate change. Foundational course of the Program in New York City. Organized around readings, student debates, guest discussion leaders, and field trips in New York City.


College 397 Internship

Work experience with a firm, organization, agency or advocacy group concerned with environmentalism, four days a week. Students will keep a journal or written account of the experience.

 
College 396 Independent Study

A substantial paper integrating the internship experience with an academic perspective and knowledge from the seminars or other tutorial readings. (Not approved for credit in Philosophy; approved for credit in Environmental Studies)


College 395 Special Topic: Environmental Ethics: The Scope of our Commitments

Critical examination and weaving together of two distinct themes in contemporary environmentalist ethics: the question of the scope and reach of ethical responsibilities in an increasingly "flat" world, to borrow a phrase from Thomas Friedman, and of what our environmental ethical responsibilities are in a global city like New York City regarding what we eat (and who produces it and how it gets to us), and how we get around. Texts will include Ramachandra Guha, Environmentalism: A Global History, and Peter Singer and Jim Mason, The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter. Counts towards the philosophy concentration. Some background work in environmental studies helpful, but not required. (Approved for credit in Philosophy or Environmental Studies)