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Advising

Preprofessional Advising and Preparing for Graduate Education

Just as Hamilton provides academic advisors to its students during their undergraduate years, so it endeavors to assist them in their plans for postgraduate study and employment. The staff of the Career Center regularly advises students on postgraduate planning, and many faculty members are available for consultation concerning study or careers in their particular fields of interest.

In recent years, approximately 16 percent of new graduates have entered graduate or professional schools directly after college. Some 50 percent enter graduate programs within five years after receiving their degrees. Since most Hamilton students undertake postgraduate study, proper preparation for such work is an important aim of the curriculum.

 

Graduate Education in Arts and Sciences

Students contemplating graduate study should consult as early as possible with the chair of the department in which they plan to concentrate. Knowledge of requirements for the primary field of interest and of appropriate related courses is essential to planning a solid program.

Any student planning on graduate work should be aware that many programs require a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language for the master's degree and often two for the doctorate. A student should consider whether French, German, Greek, Latin, Russian, Spanish or a non-Western language will be helpful.

 

Preprofessional Advising

Architecture

Students who wish to pursue graduate work in architecture should meet with Professor of Art Rand Carter (315-859-4268, rcarter@hamilton.edu).


Business School

The best preparation for business or government service is well-developed skills in reading, speaking and writing; a wide choice of courses, including economics and/or mathematics; and a concentration in the area which the student finds most interesting. Students who intend to enter a graduate school of management or business administration are strongly advised to take mathematics at least through calculus. In addition, many employers look for well-rounded students who also have demonstrated leadership, community service and involvement in extracurricular activities during their time at Hamilton.

Most masters in business administration (MBA) programs consist of a set of required core courses (typically, accounting, economics, finance, marketing, and statistics) and electives. Often electives include a cluster of courses in one specialized area (e.g., finance). Many graduate business courses, including some of the core courses, require good analytical and quantitative skills. In preparing to make yourself an attractive applicant to a top MBA program, you should develop your abilities to think quantitatively as well as write effectively. In addition, it is very unusual for the most competitive MBA programs to admit applicants without at least two or three years of work experience.

Interested students should consult the detailed recommendations for further course work and preparation for an MBA program at the prebusiness website. The prebusiness advisor is Professor Ann Owen (315-859-4419, aowen@hamilton.edu).


Engineering

Students interested in engineering as a career may pursue this interest at Hamilton in a number of ways. The cooperative program leads to the B.S. degree in an engineering field in either a 3-2 or 4-2 plan. Liberal arts-engineering (3-2) plans are in effect with Columbia University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Washington University of St. Louis. After completing three years of study at Hamilton and then two years at the cooperating engineering school, the student earns a B.A. from Hamilton and a B.S. from the engineering school.

Since the 2003-04 academic year Hamilton has offered access to a combined plan at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. This program is on a 2-1-1-1 schedule. The student completes 2 years at Hamilton and then spends his or her junior year at Dartmouth, returning to Hamilton to complete the senior year and to earn the B.A. from Hamilton. The student then returns to Dartmouth to finish the second year of engineering studies and receive a degree in engineering.

Admission to all of these programs is based on performance in coursework, recommendation by science and mathematics faculty, and the positive recommendation of the engineering advisor.

Generally, students interested in the 3-2 engineering program should plan on taking math and physics in their first term. The most appropriate course choices should be worked out in consultation with the engineering advisor during registration.

The engineering advisor is Professor Peter Millet (315-859-4706, pmillet@hamilton.edu).


Health Professions

All those considering careers in the health-related professions are encouraged to consult with Leslie Bell, interim coordinator for health professions advising (315-859-4346, lbell@hamilton.edu) early in their academic careers.

The essential course requirements that students planning to attend medical school should complete over their four years at Hamilton are: 

  • Two semesters of English or comparative literature
  • Two semesters of biology: Biology 101 and 102, or BIO 115 and one other course at the 200 level (Bio 248 or 222 are recommended). 
  • Two semesters of physics: Physics 100-105 (algebra-based) or 200-205 (calculus-based) or, for potential physics majors, Physics 190-195. 
  • Four semesters of chemistry: Chemistry 120 or 125, 190, 255, and either 265 or 270
  • Students can major in any discipline and apply to medical school. In recent years, Hamilton students have entered medical school with majors in art, economics, government, and English as well as biology, chemistry, physics and neuroscience.


Law

Many Hamilton students enter law school immediately upon graduation or within a few years thereafter. While law schools do not prescribe any particular courses or program of study as part of a formal prelaw curriculum, they seek graduates who demonstrate analytical reasoning powers, skill in oral and written forms of expression, and the ability to comprehend and organize large amounts of factual data. Students interested in entering law school are advised and assisted by the Prelaw Committee composed of faculty members and the associate director of the Career Center. For more information on pre-law advising see the prelaw website.


Teaching Certification

The minor in education studies is recommended for students who are interested in school administration, public policy and education, school counseling, design and development of curriculum, educational assessment, K-12 private school teaching, graduate studies leading to New York State initial teaching certification, requirements for provisional teaching certification in states outside of New York, and other related fields. For more information, contact Susan Mason (315-859-4373, smason@hamilton.edu).

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