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  • Having lobbied for the retention of Alexander Hamilton’s image on the $10 bill, Hamilton College is pleased with today’s announcement by U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew. The College, which is named for the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury who also served as its first trustee, also supports Secretary Lew’s intent to add illustrious women in U.S. history on the $10 bill and to honor Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill.

  • In Washington, D.C., for a reception to welcome young Hamilton College alumni to the city, mascot “Alex” took some time to protest the possible removal or reduction of the image of Alexander Hamilton by the U.S. Department of the Treasury on the $10 bill.  His Sept. 16 trip included a visit with Congressman Richard Hanna (R-NY 22nd District) who represents the Clinton  and Oneida County area.

  • Social media was abuzz this summer when Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew announced that Alexander Hamilton’s spot on the $10 bill would be given to a woman. While most agree that women, and other underrepresented groups, should be prominent on our currency, there is a major disagreement on how to make that happen.  Two Hamilton faculty members are among many Hamiltonians who have spoken publicly and for the media on the topic.

  • The New York Times published a letter to the editor penned by President Joan Hinde Stewart in its June 30 issue under the headline “Don't Diminish Hamilton.” While emphasizing the Treasury’s need “to make room for a woman on our currency,” Stewart pointed out aspects of Hamilton’s life on which few others have focused in their defense of his continued presence on the bill. “Alexander Hamilton’s rise to eminence exemplifies exactly the ideals that this immigrant nation has always espoused,” she wrote.

  • U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced this week that a woman will be featured on a redesigned $10 bill in 2020 -- the 100th anniversary of the Constitution's 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Members of the Hamilton community - and others -  support the idea of a woman on paper currency, but have a better suggestion of who should get booted off a bill.

The $400 million campaign marked the most ambitious fundraising initiative in the College's history.

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