0FF661F3-FFE9-2552-AB0AB1F527B5ACB9
5F826B93-957F-D371-4E589BA68715B028

Writing Center

Writing Resources

Writing a Book Review


Your professor may ask you to write a book review, probably of a scholarly historical monograph. Here are some questions you might ask of the book. Remember that a good review is critical, but critical does not necessarily mean negative. This list is not meant to be exhaustive, nor is it a suggested outline. Of course, you can ask these same questions of any secondary historical work, even if you're not writing a review.

  • Who is the author, and what are his or her qualifications? Has the author written other books on the subject?
  • When was the book written, and how does it fit into the scholarly debate on the subject? For example, is Smith writing to refute that idiot Jones; to qualify the work of the competent but unimaginative Johnson; or to add humbly to the evidence presented by the redoubtable Brown's classic study? Be sure not to confuse the author's argument with those arguments he or she presents only to criticize later. 
  • What is the book's basic argument? (Getting this right is the foundation of your review.)
  • What is the author's method? For example, does the author rely strictly on narrative and anecdotes, or is the book analytical in some way?
  • What kinds of evidence does the author use? For example, what is the balance of primary and secondary sources? Has the author done archival work? Is the source base substantial, or does it look thin? Is the author up-to-date in the scholarly literature?
  • How skillfully and imaginatively has the author used the evidence?
  • Does the author actually use all of the material in the bibliography, or is some of it there for display?
  • What sorts of explicit or implicit ideological or methodological assumptions does the author bring to the study? For example, does he or she profess bland objectivity? A Whig view of history? Marxism?
  • How persuasive is the author's argument?
  • Is the argument new, or is it old wine in new bottles?
  • Is the argument important, with wide-ranging implications, or is it narrow and trivial?
  • Is the book well organized and skillfully written?
  • What is your overall critical assessment of the book?
  • What is the general significance, if any, of the book? (Make sure that you are judging the book that the author actually wrote, not complaining that the author should have written a different book.)